Hi All -

My colleagues & students and I are planning a field campaign this summer at the Silas Little Experimental forest.  Much of this work is focused on tree hydraulics and evaporation, but we are also testing out some sensors that could monitor individual crown temperature, radiation, and humidity.  The premise is that individual crowns are hotter or cooler depending on species, and that this represents some difference in architecture that has implications for vulnerability to climate change.  Related to that we got a thermal camera with the dream of taking overhead imagery using a small quadcopter.  I'd love to collaborate with someone else who's doing the flying and image processing to link this with the physiology work we're developing.  Target date is something like July. Anyone game?

Adam

adamwolf@princeton.edu

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Game in!

Definitely game from my point of view!  Anyone ready to fly in NJ?

I'd be interested in partaking

I'm game for a road trip.

It seems we have a quorum. I'll update this forum post as time passes and we get closer to time to plan flights!

How about some more info on the FLIR camera?  Which model?  How much does it weigh?  what kind of imaging can it do? (video/still frame rates, resolutions?)

It's a FLIR T420 handheld, similar to this apparently newer model:

http://www.flir.com/thermography/americas/us/view/?id=46500

It's 320 x 240 pixel array with 25° or 45° FOV depending on the lens.  Weighs 0.88Kg. 

It can take 30 frames per second, but I'm uncertain how adjustable this is - - I haven't taken video with it yet. Either 30Hz is good and makes for better reconstructions, given memory limitations, or this is overkill and burdens both the image storage and postprocessing.

One nice feature is that it takes thermal and standard visible images at the same time, so we don't need a separate camera for that. 

It has a 14 bit resolution, and can be clamped to a specific temperature range (say 20C to 30C) to maximize the useable information in the biologically relevant range.

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